Picturing Apollo 11 voted one of the best astronomy and space books of 2019 by BBC Sky at Night Magazine.

https://www.skyatnightmagazine.com/top-astronomy-kit/best-astronomy-space-books/

The best astronomy and space books of 2019

Our pick of the top astronomy and space books we reviewed over the past 12 months.

 

By Iain Todd

December 4, 2019 at 12:43 pm

There is a wealth of books published each year covering all aspects of space, astronomy, astrophysics and cosmology, from practical stargazing to histories of spaceflight, and from the latest burning cosmic questions to beginners’ guides explaining the basic principles of our Solar System, Galaxy and Universe.

In each issue of BBC Sky at Night Magazine we pick the best astronomy and space books that have caught our eye that month and send them out to our expert reviewers for full scrutiny.

Below is a list of some of the top space and astronomy books we reviewed in 2019. If you’re on the hunt for a Christmas present to give to an astronomer in your life, or perhaps searching for a good read to escape the festive hubbub, look no further.

1

Moongazing

  • Author Tom Kerss
  • Publisher Collins

Our reviewer said: Kerss manages to cover a broad range of nitty-gritty lunar facts, ranging from the phases to the Apollo missions and a practical section on lunar photography using a smartphone or DSLR. The most exciting and informative segment is the ‘Introduction to the Lunar Atlas’, which divides the Moon into 16 sections and includes lunar photographs along with a map for the reader to learn the names of craters and mares. There is a two-page segment on the surface features and the categories they fall into, which ties in nicely with the maps and provides enough information for the observer to identify features on the Moon’s surface. There is much to learn from this instructive and enthusing book, which will appeal to selenophiles everywhere.

Score 4/5

Reviewer Katrin Raynor Evans is a fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society and the librarian for Cardiff Astronomical Society.

2

Brief Answers to the Big Questions

  • Author Stephen Hawking
  • Publisher John Murray

Our reviewer said “How did it all begin? Is there other intelligent life in the Universe? Is time travel possible?” These are just a few of the big questions that Stephen Hawking discusses in his final book. Hawking does not simply give us one-word answers, but walks us through his own thinking and divergences on each subject. The language is easy to follow and each chapter’s length keeps you engaged. In places the book touches on some complicated physics, but you will never feel lost. There are many inspiring parts that will stay with you and shape the way you think about these big questions in the future.

Score 5/5

Reviewer Laura Nuttall is a Senior Lecturer in Gravitational Waves at the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation at the University of Portsmouth

3

Ultimate Guide to Viewing the Cosmos

  • AuthorsDavid Dickinson & Frazer Cain
  • PublisherPage Street Publishing

Our reviewer said: Authors Dickinson and Cain are here to ease you into astronomy, providing a complex but highly readable guide for amateurs (or even veterans who need a refresher), introducing the night sky and the tools needed to observe it. They introduce us to stargazing, discuss software and equipment to aid our understanding, braving the minefield of choosing the right telescope, the right aperture, the right mount and the right eyepiece. They show us how to build a basic Newtonian refracting ‘scope for under $50.  This is a companion for any astronomer at any level, but its main message is that we should not forget to simply revel in astronomy for the awe-inspiring experience that it is.

Score 5/5

Reviewer Ben Evans is the author of several books on human spaceflight

4

Our Universe: An Astronomer’s Guide

  • AuthorJo Dunkley
  • PublisherPelican

Our reviewer said: Dunkley takes her readers on a grand tour of space and time, from our nearest planetary neighbours to the edge of the observable Universe. The book follows a well-trodden path, starting with an overview of the history of astronomy and a description of our Solar System. Stellar evolution is next, followed by galaxies, clusters and the mystery of dark matter. The birth, evolution and future of the Universe are discussed in the final chapters. Explanations are always clear, metaphors are to the point and arguments easy to follow. If you feel like refreshing your background knowledge, or are looking for a present for your curious niece or nephew, this little gem certainly won’t disappoint.

Score 4/5

Reviewer Govert Schilling is an astronomy writer and author of the book Ripples in Spacetime.

5

Space Shuttle: A Photographic Journey

  • AuthorLuke Wesley Price
  • PublisherAmmonite Press

Our reviewer said: The Shuttle was the first reusable spacecraft. Its fleet of five flew 135 times into orbit. The many successful missions were, of course, marred by two tragic accidents that cost the lives of 14 astronauts in 1986 and 2003. Those dreadful events are indeed recalled in this book, but the photos focus on the positive aspects of the Shuttle project. The bulk of the pages are packed with colour images of the Shuttles, from launch preparations through lift-off and orbit, to landing. The book ends with a gallery of individual mission insignia, followed by pages listing key data for each flight. However, it is the splendid collection of Shuttle images that makes this book so special.

Score 5/5

Reviewer Paul Sutherland is a space writer and journalist, author of Philip’s Essential Guide to Space

6

Mars: The Missions That Have Transformed Our Understanding of the Red Planet

  • AuthorRod Pyle
  • PublisherAndre Deutsch

Our reviewer said: Author and NASA consultant Rod Pyle has written a lot about the history of space exploration, but this book is a masterpiece. Pyle writes about the mission scientists and the emotions felt as they witnessed the first ever landing on the Red Planet. This book not only illustrates the brightest moments from different Mars missions, but also talks about failures and lost spacecraft, spelling out the history of our species’ curiosity with Mars and explorations of its surface. It’s an excellent read, both for those who know a lot about Mars and those who have only recently become fascinated by the Red Planet.

Score 5/5

Reviewer Sandra Kropa is a science journalist and writer

7

Picturing Apollo 11

61eGhUs8GmL

  • AuthorsJL Pickering & John Bisney
  • PublisherUniversity Press of Florida

Our reviewer said: Historian JL Pickering and journalist John Bisney’s anthology of rare photographs, Picturing Apollo 11, honours the people who strove against all odds to land a man on the Moon. Only a handful of their chosen images are readily recognisable; most have not been seen before. The book covers January to August 1969, from crew selection to their emergence from quarantine onto the world stage. The authors avoid familiar images in favour of rarer ones, often quirky, including 7-year-old Andy Aldrin trying on his father’s helmet. The book conveys the sense of awe at Apollo’s monumental scale and the photographic clarity is profound.

Score 5/5

Reviewer Ben Evans is the author of several books on human spaceflight and is a science and astronomy writer

8

No Shadow of a Doubt

  • AuthorDaniel Kennefick
  • PublisherPrinceton

Our reviewer said: At 2.13 GMT on 29th May 2019 it was exactly 100 years since Arthur Eddington and Frank Dyson stood before their telescopes ready to capture images of an eclipse they hoped would confirm Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity. The book tells of the lead up to the eclipse expeditions, details the expeditions themselves and looks at the aftermath: how Eddington and Dyson’s results were received at the time and the discussions regarding their validity up until the present day. It also discusses the role of this expedition in making Albert Einstein a household name. This is a fascinating book, full of insight into the relationship between theory and experimental proof.

Score 4/5

Reviewer Dr Emily Winterburn is the author of The Stargazer’s Guide: How to Read our Night Sky.

9

The Secret Lives of Planets

  • AuthorPaul Murdin
  • PublisherHodder & Stoughton

Our reviewer said: Paul Murdin manages to compress billions of years of Solar System history into fewer than 300 pages, as well as providing a timeline and glossary of both our nearest and furthest neighbours. The details of each object’s classification, rotation, diameter and surface temperatures are given in helpful boxouts so the reader doesn’t get lost in all the information. The Secret Lives of Planets aims to be “a user’s guide to the Solar System”, but it also turns out to be an inspiration to look at the Solar System as a long cosmic journey, and find our place in it.

Score 5/5

Reviewer Sandra Kropa is a science journalist and writer

10

The Crowd & the Cosmos

  • AuthorChris Lintott
  • PublisherOxford University Press

Our reviewer said: Over ten years ago, The Sky at Night’s Chris Lintott started Galaxy Zoo, a citizen science project to classify galaxies. It was an instant success. At present, the Zooniverse encompasses over 70 science projects. In his entertaining book, Lintott describes the origin and evolution of the Zooniverse, with a focus on the astronomy projects, including discoveries like Hanny’s Voorwerp and Tabby’s Star. The real strength of the book is in the accessible description of astronomical research and future big-data facilities like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.  Once you start reading, his book is hard to put down.

Score 4/5

Reviewer Govert Schilling is an astronomy writer and author

11

Dr Maggie’s Grand Tour of the Solar System

  • AuthorDr Maggie Aderin-Pocock
  • PublisherBuster Books

Our reviewer said: If you fancy snowboarding off Pluto’s slopes and frozen mountains, experiencing ‘diamond’ rain on Uranus or taking a 20-year plane journey from the Moon to the Sun, you could take a family trip around the Solar System with space scientist and The Sky at Night presenter Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock. In her book, aimed at older pre-teen children, a cartoonified Dr Maggie takes readers on an informative journey. It’s beautifully designed, with an appealing layout and plenty of illustrations. Packing in the entirety of the Solar System, its planets, objects, exploratory missions and history in 120 pages aimed at children is no easy task. Aderin-Pocock has made a valiant effort to do so.

Score 4/5

Reviewer Shaoni Bhattacharya is a science writer and journalist

12

Curious Cosmic Compendium

  • AuthorMartin Vargic
  • PublisherMichael Joseph

Our reviewer said: Which is the biggest and the most massive star in the Universe? Where is it located and when was it born? All the answers to these questions and many more, plus maps of places of universal importance, can be found in this Curious Cosmic Compendium. The author, artist and internet sensation Martin Vargic displays the history and wonders of the Universe in the typically creative way that brought his Miscellany of Curious Maps and Map of the Internet such praise. In more than 100 pages filled with facts and illustrations he takes the reader on a journey through the history of the cosmos.

Score 5/5

Reviewer Sandra Kropa is a science journalist and writer

13

Space: 10 Things You Should Know

  • AuthorDr Becky Smethurst
  • PublisherOrion Publishing Co

Our reviewer said: Dr Becky Smethurst has a wonderful gift for communicating some extremely exciting but also tough astrophysics in 10 bite-sized essays. If you’d like to know about supermassive black holes, the hunt for exoplanets and the expanding Universe (plus a lot more), then this book is a nice starting point. I really enjoyed the conversational writing style and the divergences that come with this. It made me feel as though Dr Becky was sat next to me. My favourite chapter is the last, which touches on the importance of searching for the unknown knowns. There’s something wonderfully inspiring communicated through the pages, and I closed the book feeling a bit more excited about my own research.

Score 4/5

Reviewer Laura Nuttall is a Senior Lecturer in Gravitational Waves in the Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation at the University of Portsmouth

14

Dark Matter & Dark Energy

  • AuthorBrian Clegg
  • PublisherIcon Books

Our reviewer said: In the past few decades, it’s become clear that we have focussed on a mere 5% of the Universe – the rest remains almost entirely unknown. Astronomers divide this mysterious majority into two types of ‘stuff’: dark matter and dark energy. Brian Clegg’s book is a clear and compact look at the current state of knowledge about these twin cosmic mysteries. After an introductory account of the discovery of both phenomena, the first half of the book focuses on dark matter. The second half tackles dark energy, with some basic cosmological groundwork followed by a discussion of dark energy and what it could mean for the future of the cosmos. It’s hard to fault as a brief, easily digestible introduction to some of the biggest questions in the Universe.

Score 5/5

Reviewer Giles Sparrow is a science writer and a fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society

15

Zwicky: The outcast genius who unmasked the Universe

  • AuthorJohn Johnson Jr
  • PublisherHarvard University Press

Our reviewer said: Fritz Zwicky is a name most astronomers learn early their careers, due to both his scientific achievements and his combative personality. This biography explores the life of this world-renowned physicist. The book spans an eventful period in world history that formed the backdrop to Zwicky’s astronomy research along with his contributions to the US war effort and rocketry. It includes details of many of Zwicky’s personal encounters, putting his various feuds and confrontations in context. It’s very interesting to read and provides a fascinating insight into a rich, complicated character and his engagement with the world he was part of.

Score 5/5

Reviewer Dr Chris North is an Odgen science lecturer and Science & Technologies Facilities Council public engagement fellow at Cardiff University

16

Saturn

  • AuthorWilliam Sheehan
  • PublisherReaktion Books

Our reviewer said: ‘Saturn’ is a detailed exploration of the most well-known of the ringed planets in our Solar System. It is an amazing account of how much we can learn from so little; how, over time, new things slowly reveal themselves, and how many questions we have yet to answer about this infamous giant world. As well as drawings from early observations of the planet, the book features some spectacular images taken by the Cassini orbiter and other missions, which combine with Sheehan’s writing to show how our understanding of Saturn has gradually deepened over the centuries. The book concludes with a detailed guide to observing Saturn in the hope that further monitoring, by both amateur and professional astronomers, will help to reveal the planet’s many remaining secrets.

Score 4.5/5

Reviewer Hannah Wakeford is an astronomer who studies the atmospheres of exoplanets at Space Telescope Science Institute

17

Handprints on Hubble

  • AuthorKathryn D Sullivan
  • PublisherMIT Press

Our reviewer said: Penned by America’s first female spacewalker, Handprints on Hubble tells the story of Kathy Sullivan, whose career took her from a pressurised space suit to the highest altitude ever reached by the Space Shuttle. As one of the first women picked by NASA for astronaut training, her memoir mixes autobiography with a solid appreciation of the Hubble Space Telescope, arguably the most important science instrument ever placed into orbit. As a ringside spectator of Challenger, Sullivan’s memories are tinged by tragedy and she remained soberly aware that she might never return from a mission. Behind every scene Hubble itself looms large – “like a beautiful silver gift from Tiffany’s” – whose contribution to understanding our place in the cosmos needs no qualification.

Score 4/5

Reviewer Ben Evans is the author of several books on human spaceflight and is a science and astronomy writer.

Apollo 15: Yellow Back-Up CDR Arm and Leg ID Mystery

By: JL Pickering

I receive quite a few photo related questions during the course of a year. I am going to use this space from time to time to start answering a few of them. Hopefully you will find some of them interesting.

First up is a question I often get regarding a minor part of the Apollo 15 back-up crew EVA training wardrobe. “Have you ever noticed that Dick Gordon was wearing yellow CDR arm and leg ID bands during training.” I had indeed noticed this many years ago, but had not put much thought into it. After being asked for about the fifth time, I looked into it a bit. It did not take long for my good friend Ed Hengeveld to produce EVA training logs that showed both prime and back-up crews had suited up at Kennedy Space Center on the same day (May 27) in 1971.
1573414668544blob
This fact apparently provides the definitive answer to the yellow CDR arm and leg ID bands. You can’t have two CDR’s running around in red ID bands. Photos below show Gordon (L) and Dave Scott (R) at KSC on May 27. Photos were taken at different times of the day. Prime crew (Scott and Jim Irwin) were training outside when back-up crew  (Gordon and Jack Schmitt) were inside.

 

To add a little to the story, Gordon is seen wearing red ID bands on May 12, 1971 as the back-up crew suited for an EVA training session at KSC. Gordon is assisted by suit tech (and artist) Ron Woods. Second photo shows Gordon on May 27 now with the yellow bands, which according to Ron was actually yellow tape wrapped over the red bands. Ron approached Dick Gordon a few years ago and showed him one of the “yellow ID band” photos. Neither one could remember anything about it. Obviously it was a long time ago.

 

 

Visit my website at http://www.retrospaceimages.com

 

Picturing Apollo 11, Back in Stock on Amazon

61eGhUs8GmL

I am happy to announce that our book “Picturing Apollo 11: Rare Views and Undiscovered Moments” is back in stock on Amazon.

Picturing Apollo 11: Rare Views and Undiscovered Moments

“Picturing Apollo 11” Makes top 10 Creative Books to Celebrate the 50th Anniversary with My Modern Met.

10 Creative Books to Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Moon Landing

Best Books on Moon Landing

The 50th anniversary of the moon landing is on July 20, 2019. Looking for a way to celebrate this amazing human achievement? Just pick up a book! Books about the moon landing offer a detailed look at the event that left an indelible mark on our culture—including rare and never-before-seen images.

To help you wade through the massive selection of titles, we’ve picked some great books about the moon landing. One publication, titled The Moon 1968 – 1972, gives us a first-hand look at what Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin saw while walking its surface—literally. The book features images taken from their Hasselblad cameras and curates from a staggering 1,400 pictures. In doing so, it gives you an overall sense of what it was like to be looking down on the Earth.

Some of the publications on our list aren’t focused on the 1969 moon landing, specifically, but they demonstrate how artists and photographers are influenced by it. Color of the Moon: Lunar Painting in American Art, for instance, highlights the different ways in which artists have recreated the celestial body. Moon Viewing: Megaliths by Moonlight is another book that shares how monoliths, created by man, are illuminated by Earth’s satellite. While incredible in scale, the megaliths still pale in comparison to the moon that looms from way above.

Check out our picks for creative books on the moon landing and beyond, below.

Here are the best creative books about the moon landing (and beyond). They are a great way to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the iconic event.

 

Best Books on Moon LandingPicturing Apollo 11: Rare Views and Undiscovered Moments by J. L. Pickering and John Bisney

Picturing Apollo 11 offers a new photographic history of the iconic space mission. It features “unpublicized and recently discovered images” that highlight the people, places, and events that helped Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Buzz Aldrin successfully land on the moon.

 

The Color of the Moon: Lunar Painting in American Art by Hudson River Museum

The moon is an alluring subject for American painters. Through an exhibition organized at the Hudson River Museum, this accompanying catalog showcases the different ways in which artists have explored the celestial body.

 

Best Books on Moon LandingThe Moon 1968 – 1972 by E.B. White and John Kennedy

The Apollo missions sent many men into space between the years of 1968 and 1972. Although each was well-documented, the astronauts were given cameras to snap pictures. Included is writing by the likes of E.B. White and President John Kennedy, making the book an exploration of the sublimity of space.

 

Best Books on Moon LandingHasselblad & the Moon Landing by Deborah Ireland

Similar to The Moon 1968 – 1972, Deborah Ireland’s book Hasselblad & the Moon Landingis an examination of the shots that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin snapped using their Hasselblad 500EL cameras. While it shares these firsthand images of the moon, the work also touches on the challenge of creating a camera that could take these pictures in the first place.

 

Best Books on Moon LandingMoon Viewing: Megaliths by Moonlight by Barbara Yoshida

Megalithic monuments (such as Stonehenge) are found around the world. Barbara Yoshida documents these monoliths with 10 years of travel, and her published work showcases how the giant stones look against the moon and stars.

 

Moon Landing AnniversaryMoon: The Art, Science and Culture of the Moon by Alexandra Loske and Robert Massey

We are endlessly fascinated with the moon and express our allure for it through storytelling, artwork, and, of course, scientific explorations. Alexandra Loske and Robert Massey trace the visual history of the moon in this “illuminating volume.”

 

Moon Landing AnniversaryApollo’s Muse: The Moon in the Age of Photography by Mia Fineman and Beth Saunders

The field of photography has undergone immense changes since the advent of the first photographApollo’s Muse showcases the history of photographic representations of the moon from daguerreotypes to video art.

 

Moon Landing AnniversaryEarthrise: How Man First Saw the Earth by Robert Poole

What happened when our imagined visions of Earth met the reality of it? Earthrise is the story of the first photographs of Earth from outer space and the impact it had on our culture, science, and religion.

 

Moon Landing AnniversaryWe Could Not Fail: The First African Americans in the Space Program by Richard Paul and Steven Moss

The Space Age began as the fight for civil rights “forced Americans to confront the long and bitter legacy of slavery, discrimination, and violence against African Americans.” During this time, Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson used federal equal employment opportunity laws to open jobs at NASA and NASA contractors to African Americans. Authors Richard Paul and Steven Moss profile 10 African American space workers whose roles at NASA and the space program helped promote civil rights.

 

Best Books on Moon LandingApollo to the Moon: A History in 50 Objects by Teasel E. Muir-Harmony

Using 50 artifacts from the Smithsonian archives, author Teasel E. Muir-Harmony tells the story of the Apollo 11 landing and man’s subsequent walk on the moon. The curated objects range from the lunar rover to space food to moon rocks, and each tells an interesting story that ultimately helped make the mission a success.

 

 

Picturing Apollo 11 in LA Times Top 8 Apollo Anniversary Book Reviews

The Apollo 11 mission to the moon launched 50 years ago. These 8 books tell the story

Buzz Aldrin’s 1969 moonwalk

Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin walks on the moon. He and Neil Armstrong their historic landing on July 20, 1969.
(NASA)

Saturday marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most remarkable moments in American history: the day that astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon. The Apollo 11 mission remains one of NASA’s most incredible achievements, and photographs from the moon landing are some of the most recognizable images in the world.

If you’re interested in the stories behind the historic mission (or are the parent of a young space buff), there’s no shortage of reading material that will help you understand Apollo 11 and the turbulent history of the era in which it took place. Here are eight books inspired by the moonshot for readers of all ages.

“Shoot for the Moon: The Space Race and the Extraordinary Voyage of Apollo 11,” James Donovan

Dallas author Donovan’s new book is a narrative chronicle of the famous NASA voyage set against the backdrop of the Cold War. Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins called the book “extensively researched and meticulously accurate” and “the best book on Apollo that I have read.”

“One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission That Flew Us to the Moon,” Charles Fishman

Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins tend to get all the glory, but the moonshot was the result of hard work by hundreds of people whose names aren’t as familiar to most Americans. Fishman’s 2019 book takes a look at the scientists, mathematicians and factory workers who helped make Apollo 11 a success.

“The NASA Archives: 60 Years in Space,” Piers Bizony, Andrew Chaikin and Roger Launius

Publisher Taschen is known for its elaborately constructed and gorgeous art books. Its new volume about NASA is an illustrated history of the space agency that features more than 400 photographs documenting America’s history in space. In a review for the L.A. Times, Drew Tewksbury wrote that the book “catalogs with beautiful detail the rapid pace of scientific and engineering advances during the 20th-century space race.”

“Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11,” Brian Floca

Kids with an interest in space will likely be fascinated by this story of the moon landing from award-winning children’s book author and artist Floca. The book tells the story of NASA’s historic mission, from takeoff to touchdown, using simple language and dramatic illustrations.

“Reaching for the Moon: The Autobiography of NASA Mathematician Katherine Johnson,” Katherine Johnson

Apollo 11 wouldn’t have been possible without Johnson, the mathematician whose work helped launch many of NASA’s most important projects. In her new autobiography for young readers, the 100-year-old Johnson (one of the subjects of the hit book and movie “Hidden Figures”) writes about her childhood and her remarkable career, when she was forced to deal with racism and sexism on a daily basis.

“The Penguin Book of Outer Space Exploration: NASA and the Incredible Story of Human Spaceflight,” edited by John Logsdon

Space-obsessed readers will likely find plenty to hold their interest in this curated collection of historical documents dealing with Apollo 11 as well as other NASA missions. Edited by the founder of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University, the book features a foreword by everyone’s favorite science guy, television personality Bill Nye.

“I Love You, Michael Collins,” Lauren Baratz-Logsted

Baratz-Logsted’s 2017 book for middle-grade readers follows 10-year-old Mamie Anderson, whose class is given an assignment to write letters to the Apollo 11 astronauts. Mamie, whose family is in the midst of an upheaval, chooses the space explorer she has the greatest connection with: Michael Collins, the only one of the three astronauts who didn’t get to set foot on the moon.

“Picturing Apollo 11: Rare Views and Undiscovered Moments,” J.L. Pickering and John Bisney

The Apollo 11 moon landing was responsible for some of the most iconic images in American history. In their new book, Pickering and Bisney present a host of never-before-seen photographs of the mission, including images of the three astronauts, the Kennedy Space Center and spectators gathered to watch history being made before their eyes.

 

Picturing Apollo 11: Rare Views and Undiscovered Moments

5CE0E12B-59AD-4CD5-BA78-2FB70FBA76FF-20414-0000072C126DDB6F

The Quest for Unpublished Photos of Apollo 11.

The Quest for Unpublished Photos of Apollo 11

10102018133123_500x500By J. L. Pickering, coauthor of Picturing Apollo 11: Rare Views and Undiscovered Moments

This book is available at a discount price through July 31, 2019, in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission. Order here and use code APOLLO.


How many photos of an historical event are “enough”? The answer likely depends on who you are. Let’s use the mission of Apollo 11, the first time humans landed on the moon, as an example. If you’re a casual student of history, the number of images that have been publicly available since 1969 are probably sufficient. If you’re more of space enthusiast, however, you want to see more, since they would add to your understanding and appreciation of what transpired.

But if you’re a true historian, the answer may be, “there are never enough!” That’s because each additional photo provides more detail and information, much like a movie showing the same scene from different angles. As someone who has been collecting, organizing, and archiving still photos from the U.S. manned space flight programs for 48 years, I fall into this category.

The Apollo 11 Saturn V at sunset at LC-39A on July 2, 1969. (Photo by Tiziou News Service)
The Apollo 11 Saturn V at sunset at LC-39A on July 2, 1969. (Photo by Tiziou News Service)
Aldrin with the LM behind him shortly after he has deployed the SWC. If the photo is enlarged, Armstrong can be seen reflected in Aldrin’s visor. Visible on the front of Aldrin’s suit are his PLSS Remote Control Unit and camera bracket. (NASA)
Aldrin with the LM behind him shortly after he has deployed the SWC. If the photo is enlarged, Armstrong can be seen reflected in Aldrin’s visor. Visible on the front of Aldrin’s suit are his PLSS Remote Control Unit and camera bracket. (NASA)

What is that astronaut holding during training? Who is the technician seen obliquely in one image but clearly in another (maybe his name can be deciphered by zooming in on his name badge)? But the desire to bring as many photos to light as possible goes beyond just factual reasons; sometimes, a more attractive version was overlooked or omitted.

Armstrong appears relaxed while wearing a space suit and floating in a tank in October 1963 during water survival training at the Naval Aircrew Candidate School in Pensacola, Florida. (NASA)
Armstrong appears relaxed while wearing a space suit and floating in a tank in October 1963 during water survival training at the Naval Aircrew Candidate School in Pensacola, Florida. (NASA)
Aldrin, Armstrong, and Collins (left to right) during recovery training on the deck of MV Retriever in the Gulf of Mexico (off the coast of Galveston, Texas) on May 24, 1969. (NASA)
Aldrin, Armstrong, and Collins (left to right) during recovery training on the deck of MV Retriever in the Gulf of Mexico (off the coast of Galveston, Texas) on May 24, 1969. (NASA)

The relatively small universe of photos released by NASA, however, was not nefarious but was determined by the demand. It’s important to remember that during the Apollo era, newspapers (almost all printing in black and white halftone) and general-interest magazines only needed so many photos; and digital reproduction and the Internet were still decades away.

Aldrin (left) meets with astronauts Ron Evans (center) and Schmitt during a lunar surface experiment deployment simulation on January 21. Aldrin examines a Hasselblad 500 EL Data Camera similar to one he would use on the lunar surface. Evans was a member of the Apollo 11 astronaut “third string” support crew. (NASA)
Aldrin (left) meets with astronauts Ron Evans (center) and Schmitt during a lunar surface experiment deployment simulation on January 21. Aldrin examines a Hasselblad 500 EL Data Camera similar to one he would use on the lunar surface. Evans was a member of the Apollo 11 astronaut “third string” support crew. (NASA)
Armstrong is contemplative following the June 18 session. He had recently received thousands of suggestions regarding what his first words on the Moon should be. (NASA)
Armstrong is contemplative following the June 18 session. He had recently received thousands of suggestions regarding what his first words on the Moon should be. (NASA)

In the intervening forty years, attention also turned to what would end up as something of a temporary future: the space shuttle program, lasting from 1981–2011. When digital photography arrived during the 1990s, the number of shuttle images exploded and “storing” them was not a problem. Meanwhile, however, tens of thousands of celluloid negatives and prints from the past Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs were packed away and eventually sent from NASA’s field centers to the National Archives.

A crane prepares to lift Apollo 11’s S-II booster off a workstand in the transfer aisle of the VAB on February 6, 1969. The 81.5-foot-tall and 33-foot-diameter S-II was built by North American Rockwell in Seal Beach, California, and, powered by five J-2 engines, produced approximately 1,000,000 pounds of thrust. (NASA)
A crane prepares to lift Apollo 11’s S-II booster off a workstand in the transfer aisle of the VAB on February 6, 1969. The 81.5-foot-tall and 33-foot-diameter S-II was built by North American Rockwell in Seal Beach, California, and, powered by five J-2 engines, produced approximately 1,000,000 pounds of thrust. (NASA)
Tourists take in the rocket and spacecraft display at KSC Visitor Center. “Apollo fever” was gripping the country as KSC became the focal point for the upcoming Moon launch. More than 8,000 people were touring the Moonport daily in the week leading up to the launch. (Photo by Tiziou News Service)
Tourists take in the rocket and spacecraft display at KSC Visitor Center. “Apollo fever” was gripping the country as KSC became the focal point for the upcoming Moon launch. More than 8,000 people were touring the Moonport daily in the week leading up to the launch. (Photo by Tiziou News Service)

A significant cache of material ended up in a spare railroad boxcar parked in the Florida heat and humidity near the Launch Complex 39 Press Site, and after years of neglect, was headed to a local landfill. A few concerned retirees managed to save thousands of prints. Many of them, however, had already been released (or at least made available to the media) during the 1970s. The bulk of physical Apollo-era photography was eventually boxed up and sent to one of three National Archives facilities in Maryland, Texas, or Georgia. In the past few years I have spent many weeks and dollars at these facilities scanning and “liberating” images from color negatives that were never printed.

Spectators in a parking lot near the VAB wave an American flag as Apollo 11 begins its journey to the Moon. The Saturn’s automatic engine shutdown function was inhibited during the first thirty seconds to prevent the vehicle from falling back onto the pad during a launch failure, seen as the least preferable option at that stage of the flight. (Photo by Tiziou News Service)
Spectators in a parking lot near the VAB wave an American flag as Apollo 11 begins its journey to the Moon. The Saturn’s automatic engine shutdown function was inhibited during the first thirty seconds to prevent the vehicle from falling back onto the pad during a launch failure, seen as the least preferable option at that stage of the flight. (Photo by Tiziou News Service)
Details of the flight were eagerly devoured; the News Citizen was a local Houston-area newspaper. (Photo by Tiziou News Service)
Details of the flight were eagerly devoured; the News Citizen was a local Houston-area newspaper. (Photo by Tiziou News Service)

Many of these photos—and others I have obtained from private sources—form the core of the space history photo books I produce with my coauthor, former news correspondent John Bisney. Our goal is always to go beyond the “greatest hits” to bring readers a wealth of great new images they would never otherwise see. These locked-away photos, taken on the ground as opposed to the more famous (and fully released) in-flight images snapped by the astronauts, capture moments in time, split seconds in history that will never be repeated. They’re filled with far more than astronauts and spacecraft—instead they reveal the men and women behind the successes and failures of the early U.S. manned space program. We see their emotions, their workplaces, and glimpses of their everyday lives and culture on the job.

Government and industry engineers monitor the Apollo 11 CDDT in firing room 1 on July 2, 1969. Approximately 450 persons were present during the test. (NASA)
Government and industry engineers monitor the Apollo 11 CDDT in firing room 1 on July 2, 1969. Approximately 450 persons were present during the test. (NASA)
Members of the flight control team at Mission Control in Houston wave U.S. flags and light up cigars at the successful conclusion of the mission on July 24. (NASA)
Members of the flight control team at Mission Control in Houston wave U.S. flags and light up cigars at the successful conclusion of the mission on July 24. (NASA)

This is why I continue to persevere to try to overcome a less-than-helpful federal bureaucracy not particularly interested in devoting resources to releasing images from half a century ago, now languishing in government warehouses. John and I are always delighted to bring you the results.


Pickering_JL-Credit-JStevenJordanJ. L. Pickering, coauthor (with John Bisney) of Picturing Apollo 11: Rare Views and Undiscovered Moments, has been archiving rare space images for some forty years. Drawing from NASA archives, retired NASA personnel, news photographers, and other sources, his collection numbers more than 120,000 high-resolution prints and images. He covered the final Apollo/Saturn launch in 1975 and attended numerous Space Shuttle launches. Today he serves as a resource and expert for authors, documentary filmmak­ers, museums, former astronauts, and even NASA. He lives in Bloomington, Illinois.