Picturing Apollo 11: Rare Views and Undiscovered Moments Reviews

I came across this summation of book reviews pertaining to our Apollo 11 Book yesterday, and it sums it up nicely.

 

About the Author

J. L. Pickering is a spaceflight historian and authority who has been archiving rare space images for more than 40 years.
John Bisney is a journalist who has covered the space program for CNN, the Discovery Science Channel, and SiriusXM Radio. Together, they have coauthored Space¬shots and Snapshots of Projects Mercury and Gemini: A Rare Photographic History, Moonshots and Snapshots of Project Apollo: A Rare Photographic History, and The Space-Age Presidency of John F. Kennedy: A Rare Photographic History.

Reviews

“Pickering and Bisney present a host of never-before-seen photographs of the mission, including images of the three astronauts, the Kennedy Space Center and spectators gathered to watch history being made before their eyes.”–Los Angeles Times “50 years ago this July, Neil Armstrong took ‘one giant leap for mankind’ as he became the first human to step foot on the moon’s surface–and now, never-before-seen pictures provide a unique glimpse behind the profound 1969 voyage.”–Daily Mail “In a story told primarily through photos and captions, historian Pickering and journalist Bisney (coauthors of Moonshots and Snapshots of Project Apollo), chronicle 1969’s heady days of ‘moon fever.’ Across 10 well-organized chapters, the selected images capture the country’s mounting excitement; the meticulous preparation of astronauts Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong, and Michael Collins; and finally the moon landing itself and the crew’s return to Earth. Subjects range from the magnificent–the Apollo 11 rocket at sunset or twilight on the launching pad–to the mundane–the astronauts signing rental car forms at a NASA base. Some of the most affecting images are simple portraits of Aldrin, Armstrong, and Collins, which amply capture their discipline and determination. In the introduction, Bisney notes that he and Pickering don’t claim to include any new material from space, as all ‘in-flight photography’ has been publicly available since 1969; NASA buffs familiar with such images may find fresh interest in, for instance, those of the astronauts enduring a 21-day isolation period after their return and then being feted around the world. The reader is left with an ample sense of the astronauts’ fame and, thanks to Pickering and Bisney’s wise selections, of their lasting accomplishment.”–Publishers Weekly “The perfect launch vehicle for younger generations to vicariously experience the nation’s nervous anticipation prior to Apollo 11’s blastoff, through to the final euphoric roar at seeing Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin kick up moon dust.”–Foreword Reviews “Whenever we think of Apollo 11, we think of people; not just Armstrong, Collins and Aldrin, but the 400,000 who put the mission together, the million-strong crowd who filled the beaches and roads of Cape Kennedy, and the audience of half a billion who tuned in on radio or TV. . . . Picturing Apollo 11 honours the people who strove against all odds to land a man on the Moon.”–Sky at Night Magazine “An amazing collection of images that captures every aspect of the mission.”–Quest: The History of Human Spaceflight “The perfect launch vehicle for younger generations to vicariously experience the nation’s nervous anticipation prior to Apollo 11’s blastoff, through to the final euphoric roar at seeing Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin kick up moon dust.”–Foreword Reviews “What this book accomplishes is something unique. . . . These images go far beyond Armstrong and Aldrin’s lunar landing to show the tense, thrilling and even mundane moments along the way in the Apollo program.”–Space “Paint[s] a detailed picture of the moon landing. . . . A comprehensive photographic history of Apollo 11.”–Seattle Times
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